Tanks
What's inside those mechanized fighting vehicles?
Firearms
See the insides of rifles, handguns, automatic weapons, etc.

This is what a generic 1950s hand grenade looks like, cut in half.  The only difference between the two versions of the hand grenade is that the second one shows the safety pin ring removed and the safety lever raised.  Thus, the striker (circled) is allowed to rotate and light the timed fuse.

Click to Enlarge to 638 x 771 px:

Hand Grenade Cutaway Drawing 1951

Hand Grenade Cutaway Drawing 1951

Source:  Popular Science November 1951

Even though development of the Lark began during World War II, it was not finished in time to assist U.S. troops.  Development picked up again during 1946-1950, and it was used mainly for testing at sea.

The real soul of the Lark was in its “brain”:  a set of guidance controls (shown on the cutaway), which made this 1,200 pound missile the “first U.S. surface-to-air missile ever to intercept a moving air target,” according to the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum.

Click to Enlarge to 1088 x 721 px:

Lark Ground to Air Guided Missile 1950

Lark Ground to Air Guided Missile 1950

Illustration by Ray Quigley shows an anti-sub device from 1950 termed “the hedgehog.”

It lobbed multiple depth charges all at once at the presumed submarine location.  Charges were slightly angled so that they would land in a spreadout, scattershot pattern, covering a wider range.

 Click to Enlarge to 695 x 768 px:

Ship-Based Anti Submarine Defense Cutaway, 1950

Ship-Based Anti Submarine Defense Cutaway, 1950

Source:  Popular Science March 1950