Tanks
What's inside those mechanized fighting vehicles?
Firearms
See the insides of rifles, handguns, automatic weapons, etc.

In 1951, the term “supertanker” had not yet been invented.  But with the United States’ growing appetite for oil post WWII, the need would soon arise for shipping massive quantities of crude overseas, at ever lower costs.

The S.S. Atlantic Seaman was considered a supertanker in its era, transporting 257,935 gallons of oil–enough to move 16,000 cars 10,000 miles each, as the text notes.

By way of comparison to today’s supertankers, of course, the S.S. Atlantic Seaman isn’t much.  Some of today’s largest tankers can transport 2,000,000 barrels of oil.

S.S. Atlantic Seaman Oil Tanker Cutaway 1951

S.S. Atlantic Seaman Oil Tanker Cutaway 1951

Source:  Popular Science July 1951

Illustration by Ray Quigley shows an anti-sub device from 1950 termed “the hedgehog.”

It lobbed multiple depth charges all at once at the presumed submarine location.  Charges were slightly angled so that they would land in a spreadout, scattershot pattern, covering a wider range.

 Click to Enlarge to 695 x 768 px:

Ship-Based Anti Submarine Defense Cutaway, 1950

Ship-Based Anti Submarine Defense Cutaway, 1950

Source:  Popular Science March 1950

Aircraft Carrier Steam Catapult, 1953

Aircraft Carrier Steam Catapult, 1953

Pictured is a 1953 cutaway of the planned HMS Perseus, showing the novel introduction of a steam catapult to replace the customary cylinder, ram, pulley, and wire catapults.

The plane is hooked to a long, slotted cylinder.  High pressure steam is released from the ship’s boilers into the cylinder.

As of the date of that article, only test planes and concrete weights had been launched.  But these test “flights” were highly successful.  One unpiloted test plane was flung to 1,500 feet and circled the ship for four minutes while everyone ran for cover.  Finally, its tanks ran dry and the plane fell into the sea.

Source: Popular Mechanics March 1953

Oceanliner Cristoforo Columbo Cutaway, 1955

Oceanliner Cristoforo Columbo Cutaway, 1955

Behold, in all its gigantic 2500 x 1060 px glory, the oceanliner Cristoforo Columbo from 1955.

This 29,100 ton Italian Line ship provided 703 tourist class, 225 first class, and 320 cabin class cabins.

It’s a Rolf Klep masterpiece, part of a larger LIFE double spread that included an Super-G Constellation in the upper left.  I’ve done my best to stitch it together from separate images.

Source:  LIFE June 27, 1955