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Artist unknown, as this was a tossed-off illustration in the middle of a Popular Science, but what interested me:

  1. This is one helluva massive radio station.
  2. It’s still around.

It’s called the Jim Creek Naval Radio Station, and the Center for Land Use Interpretation tells us:

One of the world’s most powerful transmitters, this million watt Navy radio facility communicates with submarines at sea using very low frequency radio waves. Built in 1953 in the foothills of the northern Cascades, ten massive antenna cables, all more than a mile long, span the Jim Creek valley, suspended by twenty 200 foot tall towers.

Click to Enlarge to 927 x 757 px:

Jim Creek Naval Transmitting Station 1950

Jim Creek Naval Transmitting Station 1950

Illustration by Ray Quigley shows an anti-sub device from 1950 termed “the hedgehog.”

It lobbed multiple depth charges all at once at the presumed submarine location.  Charges were slightly angled so that they would land in a spreadout, scattershot pattern, covering a wider range.

 Click to Enlarge to 695 x 768 px:

Ship-Based Anti Submarine Defense Cutaway, 1950

Ship-Based Anti Submarine Defense Cutaway, 1950

Source:  Popular Science March 1950

Its proper name was the Mark VII Attack Teacher and it was housed in a 3 story building in New London, CT.

In an age before computers could process graphics, vehicle and nautical simulations had to be done with models.

Trainees sat in a submarine mockup on the second floor, with a periscope jutting up into the third floor.  On that third floor was a terrazzo tile floor–each square representing 1,000 yards–with remote control wired cars made up to look like little submarines.

Operators in the control room would plot enemy courses with the aid of mainframe computers.

The model was so accurate that it even duplicated the curvature of the Earth.

Click to Enlarge to 895 x 607 px:

Dry Land Submarine Trainer 1950

Dry Land Submarine Trainer 1950

Represented below is a closeup of the terrazzo floor, showing that one ship (#5) is within 2,000 yards of the periscope.  Note wires extending from ships.

 

Submarine Trainer Simulation Floor 1950

Submarine Trainer Simulation Floor 1950

Source:  Popular Science January 1950

A gorgeous late 1960s cutaway from Pierre Mion for the “Deep Diver,” a ferry submarine designed by Edwin A. Link and built by Perry Submarine Builders, Riviera Beach, FL.

This 22-foot, 4-man craft was meant for work, not play–underwater construction or research.

Interestingly, Perry Submarines is still around and making submersibles, one of which is going for $695,000!

Click to Enlarge to 1108 x 761 px:

Deep Diver Ferry Submarine Cutaway 1967

Deep Diver Ferry Submarine Cutaway 1967

Source:  Popular Mechanics July 1967

This is a superb cutaway drawing on an Astute class submarine–British Royal Navy nuclear fleet submarines.

Astute Class Submarine Cutaway

Astute Class Submarine Cutaway

Towards the Stern

Astute Class Submarine Cutaway - Stern

Astute Class Submarine Cutaway – Stern

70 – Ship’s Office

68 – Forward Hydroplane

78 – High Pressure Air Bottles

Toward Midships

Astute Class Submarine Cutaway - Midships

Astute Class Submarine Cutaway – Midships

45 – Port Side Communications Office

60 – Control Room Consoles

62 – Senior Ratings Bunks

58 – Senior Ratings Bathrooms