Tanks
What's inside those mechanized fighting vehicles?
Firearms
See the insides of rifles, handguns, automatic weapons, etc.
Oceanliner Cristoforo Columbo Cutaway, 1955

Oceanliner Cristoforo Columbo Cutaway, 1955

Behold, in all its gigantic 2500 x 1060 px glory, the oceanliner Cristoforo Columbo from 1955.

This 29,100 ton Italian Line ship provided 703 tourist class, 225 first class, and 320 cabin class cabins.

It’s a Rolf Klep masterpiece, part of a larger LIFE double spread that included an Super-G Constellation in the upper left.  I’ve done my best to stitch it together from separate images.

Source:  LIFE June 27, 1955

Super-G Constellation Cutaway, 1955

Super-G Constellation Cutaway, 1955

A fine cutway from 1955 by famed illustrator Rolf Klep, of a Super-G Constellation.

This is actually part of an amazing double-spread from a LIFE magazine, showing both this aircraft and the oceanliner Cristoforo Columbo.

Accompanying text notes that the Constellation had a flexible seating arrangement.  In this drawing, tourist class passengers occupied the forward compartment, while first class passengers enjoyed reclining seats with foot rests in the middle compartment.

The Super G was produced from 1951 to 1958.

Source: LIFE Jun 27, 1955

Consolidated Vultee Clipper For PanAm Cutaway, 1945

Consolidated Vultee Clipper For PanAm Cutaway, 1945

I’m not certain when this Rolf Klep cutaway was produced, but the magazine text mentions that V-E Day was upcoming, so I’ll put it at 1945.

This 160 ton aircraft was expected to be able to take 200 passengers from New York to London in 9 hours.

Consolidated ventured that it would build about 15 Vultee Clippers for PanAm immediately following the War.

Vultee Clipper Cockpit Cutaway, ca 1945

Vultee Clipper Cockpit Cutaway, ca 1945

 

 

 

Rolf Klep

Rolf Klep

One great technical illustrator who produced many great cutaway drawings was Rolf Klep.

Klep was born in 1904 in the great shipping hub of the Pacific Northwest, Astoria, Oregon.  As such, Klep gravitated toward shipping and other marine-related illustration work.

During the Second World War, he was in charge of graphic arts production in the Office of Chief Naval Operations.

In 1935, Klep began illustrating for Fortune magazine.

After he retired in 1962, Klep returned to Astoria and help found the Columbia River Maritime Museum.  He died in 1981.

Rolf Klep Signature

Rolf Klep Signature

Cutaway Drawings By Rolf Klep